Yushukan (Yushukwan), Kudan, c. 1910.



1910sGovernmentMuseums & Expositions/ExhibitionsPatriotism/Military
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Yasukuni Shrine at Kudan, Tokyo, c. 1910

“Continuing on, we inspected a number of cannon taken during the late war with China, lying outside a building containing many other trophies secured during the campaign … In the interior of the building (Yushu-kwan) there is a large collection of standards taken from the Mongols during the China war, and riddled with bullets: Japanese military clothing, fashioned from blankets, to resist the cold, which was intense during part of the campaign.”

To Nippon: The Land of the Rising Sun, Wilson Le Couteur, 1899

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From the wiki: “The Yushukan [museum of armament] was first established in 1882 to preserve and display Meiji Restoration-era artifacts of the Imperial Japanese Army. Following the First Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895) and Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905), the Meiji Emperor issued his 192nd order in 1910, which ordered the preservation of military artifacts. The building was expanded when the number of documents and artifacts increased after World War I, but the structure collapsed and was demolished during the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake. The structure was rebuilt, reopening in 1932.”

The rebuilt, post-earthquake Yushu-kwan, now on the premises of Yasukuni Shrine, c. 1940.

An "interactive" museum exhibit at the Yushukan, Tokyo, c. 1940.

An “interactive” museum exhibit at the Yushukan, Tokyo, c. 1940.

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