Yaomatsu Restaurant, Mukojima, c. 1910.



1910sArchitectureCherry BlossomsNotable Landmark
Tagged with: , ,
Yaomatsu restaurant on the Sumida River, at Mukojima, c. 1910.

Yaomatsu restaurant (right), across from Asakusa, at the Makurabashi ferry crossing, c. 1910.

“We are on our way to the far end of the long Mukojima highway, at least six miles from town, where we shall find an inn that is completely and entirely Japanese in structure and surroundings. It is called the ‘Yao Matsu,’ ‘The Place of Eight-Hundred Pine-Trees.’

“It is the most aristocratic resort of Tokyo, patronized only by the richer Japanese, unknown to foreigners, unmentioned in ‘Murray’s,’ remote from tramways, far above the terminus of the puffy tugboats on the river – in a word, secure from all the influences which are dispelling the peaceful atmosphere and ruining the picturesqueness of Japan.”

Burton Holmes Travelogues, Burton Holmes, 1901

Yaomatsu restaurant on the Sumida River, at Mukojima, c. 1910.

Looking north from the Yaomatsu restaurant, c. 1910, on the Sumida River at Mukojima.

“First came the earthquake recovery projects of Hamacho and Sumida parks, both featuring modern promenades along the Sumida riverfront. They and Kinshi Park – the three major parks incorporated into the city’s earthquake recovery plan – were meant to promote the health, sanitation, rest, and recreation that Tokyo residents required.

“Sumida Park made its debut as a mile-long promenade along both sides of the river, with an innovative Western design that restored the lyrical Sumida landscape. In order to create just the right modern vista, the venerable Yaomatsu restaurant was torn down.”

Tokyo, a Spatial Anthropology, Hidenobu Jinnai, 1995

Sumida Park at Kototoi-bashi, c. 1930, near the site of the old Yaomatsu restaurant at Makurabashi. The Kototoi bridge and renovated park were post-earthquake public works projects.

Sumida Park at Kototoi-bashi, c. 1930, near the site of the old Yaomatsu restaurant at Makurabashi. The Kototoi bridge and renovated park were post-earthquake public works projects.

Please support this site. Consider clicking an ad from time to time. Thank you!

· One thought below on “Yaomatsu Restaurant, Mukojima, c. 1910.

  1. Pingback: Sumida River Ferry Boats, c. 1910. | Old Tokyo

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.